panoramic views over Murlough Bay

Murlough Bay

‘What mountain shall I climb next?’ I pondered the delightful array of monumental masses on the map in front of me. Having conquered Slieve Loughshannagh and eleven twelfths of Doan the week before, I was eager to get back to the Mournes. My Polaroid was on charge, the Prosecco was in the fridge, all I had to do was pick a peak.

‘There won’t be any hillwalking this week,’ Lionel said after listening to the local weather forecast that predicted snow, hail and gale force winds in the mountains.

I was gutted!

Instead, he suggested we go to beautiful Murlough Bay, on the Antrim Coast. So, with the promise of better weather and stunning scenery, I set down my rucksack and picked up my camera.

Murlough Bay

Remote, rugged and reached by a single lane road, Murlough Bay did not disappoint. There were blue skies and breathtaking views out over the sea to Rathlin Island, the Scottish Mull of Kintyre and Jura.

View of path towards cliffs of Fairhead

We followed a path that led us down a grassy slope towards the cliffs of Fairhead.

Miner’s Cottage

A bench by the ruins of a miner’s cottage gave an unspoilt view out over the bay.

Game of Thrones

For any Game of Thrones fans, the Stormlands were filmed on the cliffs above Murlough Bay, which was the setting for Slaver’s Bay in the HBO hit series.

Stony Cove

We scrambled over rocks and followed the path until we reached the Bothy, a small cottage by the sea.

From there we made our way up through a wood peppered with pretty bluebells.

We continued to climb up to an elevation of 350m and were rewarded with spectacular panoramic views.

While there was no peak and no Polaroids, there were plenty of photographs to peruse over a glass of Prosecco when we got back home and it was a wonderful coastal walk.

Peaks: none

Polaroids: none

Prosecco: the whole bottle of bubbly!